It all starts with a story | By: Nicole Dunn

It all starts with a story | By: Nicole Dunn

As part of our Allan Gray Orbis Legacy Project, the Year Experience Candidate Fellows partnered with Nal’ibali (isiXhosa for “here’s the story”) to promote multilingual literacy and a love for reading. As a year group, we value the power of education and cultural relevance in literary development. When looking for a partner to collaborate with, Nal’ibali was the perfect fit. The national organisation aims to foster reading-for-enjoyment among South Africa’s children by training adults to be reading role models and activists; raising awareness about the importance of reading for enjoyment; and producing, translating and distributing books and stories in all South African languages.

Our fundraising campaign ran over a number of months, and donors were given the opportunity to write a personalised inscription to the reader they were supporting. With the help and generosity of our network, we raised enough money to donate a mobile library and box of stationery to Chumisa Primary School in Khayelitsha.

At the hand-over event, we celebrated the efforts of Ms Gcotyelwa Gcogco Mwahleni, an isiXhosa and Creative Arts teacher, who founded a reading club at Chumisa. Sis’ Gcogco, as she is affectionately known, is a role model to the 30 students who attend her reading club each week. She encourages her learners to create plays from the stories she reads, helping to build their confidence and relate the concepts to their own lives. Through her efforts, the students have come to develop a love for reading, participating in community literacy programmes and spelling bee competitions.

Educators like Sis’ Gcocgo are heroes not only to their students, but to the country as a whole. They play a critical role in nurturing young potential and instilling self-belief in children who do not always come from supportive circumstances. We are honoured to recognise and celebrate her commitment to education, and to contribute the resources she needs to grow her reading club initiative.

As a year group, we believe that a legacy is not something that is left for people, but left in people. Through this campaign, we sought to leave a legacy in South Africa’s future readers and leaders, who we hope will grow to share their own stories of success. These narratives have the power to empower and transform communities, by inspiring children to believe in themselves, and that their dreams are possible.

After all, it all starts with a story.

 

Nal’ibali currently has 2 179 reading clubs active in all 9 provinces that reach 64 609 children. To date, it has trained 14 689 people to be reading champions for children/to support children’s literacy development. To find out more about the exceptional work that the organisation does, visit their website (www.nalibali.org) or Facebook page (@nalibaliSA).

The appointment of our new CEO

The appointment of our new CEO

It is with great pleasure that we announce the appointment of our new CEO, Yogavelli Nambiar.

Yogavelli succeeds Anthony Farr, who tendered his resignation earlier this year after 12 years at the helm of the Foundation. He will be moving on to take up responsibilities for Allan & Gill Gray Philanthropies (Africa), a philanthropic arm of the Allan & Gill Gray Foundation.

At the time of his resignation, Anthony said: “The greatest adventure of my life was being part of the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation. But as with any adventure there comes a time to step aside.” Yogavelli inherits a well-established Foundation, equipped to embrace a range of new challenges associated with the modern world and to further grow the organisation.

“We are pleased to welcome Yogavelli to her new role as CEO of the Foundation. She has so many insights to offer and we look forward to drawing on her long line of experience developing entrepreneurs across the African continent,” says board chairman, Professor Njabulo Ndebele.

Professor Ndebele again thanked Anthony, who he says delivered well on the Foundation’s inception mandate to invest, inspire and develop individuals who will go on to become high impact, responsible entrepreneurs capable of transforming the future of the Southern African Region.

As the new CEO, Yogavelli joins the Foundation with extensive experience, having previously founded and headed up the Enterprise Development Academy at the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS), business school of the University of Pretoria as its Director, where she led the entrepreneurship efforts of the school within the centre. Prior to that she was Country Director of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women Initiative and led the design and delivery of this successful international women’s entrepreneurship programme in South Africa.

“I am excited to be part of the brainchild of Allan Gray and to work alongside a long line of capable individuals who work tirelessly to help make a sustainable, long-term and positive contribution to Southern Africa. Thank you to the board for entrusting me in my capacity as the Foundation’s new CEO,” Yogavelli says.

Professor Ndebele concludes: “Yogavelli’s experience and expertise will ensure future opportunities are harnessed while building on the institutional capabilities of the Foundation in the process.”

You Can’t Win the Raffle If You Don’t Buy a Ticket

You Can’t Win the Raffle If You Don’t Buy a Ticket

The 2017 Allan-Gray Orbis Foundation Jamboree event is an incredible opportunity to expose your idea to a world of possibility. Your idea is interrogated, torn-up and built-up by a room filled with bright students. This has opened up many doors for us including meeting the executives of Zoona, Silicon Cape and a large part of the tech-ecosystem in and around Cape Town.

We are currently building our MVP and are incubated with the Telkom Innotech Programme at the Bandwidth Barn.

This is our story;

“The Jamboree experience began before we had even arrived at Jamboree. My partner (Sinqobile Mashalaba) and I were on the late transport set to arrive the Friday evening. We had discussed the prospect of pitching our idea that weekend but given how little thought and effort we had given it, the consensus was that we would be underprepared and, hence, very easily overlooked. Boy, how wrong were we!

Don’t get me wrong, our business idea had undergone about 8 weeks of intense incubation and we were in the process of concluding our first transaction. So we had some traction behind us but, coming straight out of exams, we did not have a pitch-deck ready nor did we have any notion of our pitch structure or how we would respond to some tough questions. Nonetheless, we made a bold decision to put ourselves out there for the community to see. Though we lacked much, what we did have was a strong sense of purpose and validation.Simon Sinek put it best in a Ted Talk when he spoke about how people care much, much more about WHY you are doing something than WHAT it is you are actually doing. Before you can sell product, you must sell purpose. So, with that motivation, my partner and I decided to put Hlanganisa down as a Wildcard. Then, it all began…

We did not much sleep that weekend- which was difficult considering we had just come off an intense exam period. We persevered because there was strong sense of conviction to present Hlanganisa in the best way possible. In all honesty, it had very little to do with winning. It had almost everything to do with growing because as an early stage start up, your idea and the work that you have put into it is all you have. And if you are going to present it on a platform such as Jamboree, you got to give it all you got. Anything less is a disservice to your business idea and to the time and energy you have put into it.

The Open Canvas happened on Saturday and the responses we were receiving were unbelievable. On the one hand, we were receiving validation that what we are doing is necessary and makes sense (which is always so good to hear!) while on the other, we were receiving advice and tips on how we could do it better. Having made it into the top 10, excitement and nerves were high- but so was physical fatigue. We do not think we will ever be able to explain how we were able to get up on that stage and pitch, given the state we were in, but we did and it was WELL WORTH IT!.

Winning Jamboree is something We will always be proud of. We encourage every Candidate Fellow to open themselves up to at least one Jamboree experience. As the old saying goes: ”You can’t win the raffle if you don’t buy a ticket.”

– Hlanganisa Team

 

 

Scholarship Development Camp: Grade 10 & 11

Scholarship Development Camp: Grade 10 & 11

The picturesque town of Franschhoek was the setting for the grade 10 and 11 Allan Gray Orbis Foundation National Development Camp. This town is rooted in history and is a stone’s throw away from the Klein Drakenstein Prison, the iconic setting of Nelson Mandela’s release and the emergence of a new democracy. The place where the South African dream of an equal South Africa for all took flight.

The Foundation’s vision of an equitable South Africa is driven by our belief that a community of high impact responsible entrepreneurs will positively shape the economic, social and political landscape of our beloved country. We also know that this takes time and patience to bring to bear a transformed South Africa. It is in the hands of our beneficiaries to take up the challenge and it is our duty to empowering these bright sparks. However, this journey to empowerment is not a quick fix with short-term change but rather sustainable change and movement toward personal dignity and courage.

The Scholar Development Programme comprises of various interventions of which the National Development Camp is one. It is a pitstop in our Scholars’ journey toward growing themselves and their entrepreneurial mindset in preparation of the Fellowship opportunity. In his book, Seven Habit of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey say that personal victory leads to public victory and this means knowing yourself equals winning in the game of life. For this reason, one of the core foci of the Development programme is Personal Mastery. In support of this we hosted Personal Mastery sessions dealing with identity, choice and diversity which highlighted the challenges Scholars navigate daily. Scholars identified with diverse issues such as not fitting in and the fear of being different among other. These sessions also saw Scholars emboldened toward personal change and the roots of transformation evident in their reflection on the transformative power of the sessions.

One of the broader aims of the Foundation is to build a community of like-minded individuals who may affect future change. The Fellowship host Jamboree, a space where Candidate Fellows can grow their entrepreneurial muscle and pitch their ideas to a cohort of their peers. The Scholars were given the opportunity to be a part of Jamboree, gaining direct access to Candidate Fellows and Association members. Among the Candidate Fellows Scholars also met up with Scholar Alumni who had made the transition into the Fellowship programme. A handful of Scholars also took some time to pitch their ideas at the Jamboree.

Finally, the Scholars were taken on a journey that explored the concept of entrepreneurial mindsets. They were given scope to ideate, present, design and prototype a response to the challenges outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP). To give context to how young South Africans are addressing issues related to the NDP Scholar used Dadewethu, a social entrepreneurial business, who provides solutions for the lack of support for females at the university campus of UCT (University of Cape Town) as a live case study. Scholars then had an opportunity to experience bringing their ideas to life at the Maker-Space in Observatory, Cape Town giving them the opportunity to apply their understanding of entrepreneurial mindset in a live simulation.

There was a general sense that this Development Camp galvanised Scholars resolve to remain connected to the Foundation pipeline.

 

Accelerated Entrepreneurship: A Taste of the Real Thing

Accelerated Entrepreneurship: A Taste of the Real Thing

For one weekend only, the graduating Fellows of 2016 left their ordinary comfortable lives of new employment or post-graduate studies to occupy a seat at the executive table of New Horizons Financial Services. This pilot Accelerated Entrepreneurship Assessment Lab spearheaded by the Association aimed at developing the personal and entrepreneurial mind-sets of the latest cohort of fellows.

One would think that having being on the Foundation from year engage to experience, the Fellows would be well equipped to develop and implement a turnaround strategy in a company over a weekend. The reality of the situation was that when faced with decisions relating to cutting costs in order to achieve a higher returns, Fellows needed direction as to how to do this effectively. This highlighted the fact that no matter how well read you are about entrepreneurship, you still need guidance through the practical elements in order to succeed.

Over the course of the weekend, Fellows were tasked with managing a company in the financial services sector for three years. A high pressure environment was created by the volume of information that teams had to digest in a limited time period. And competition, of course. The mandate for the three years was clear: increase return on equity, customer and employee satisfaction while simultaneously decreasing costs. Teams were given a board pack outlining the operations, strategy and financials of New Horizons from which they had to develop a strategy on how to achieve the objective at hand.  After each financial year, the teams’ performance was evaluated. Some teams made bold moves by firing half of their work force in the first year only to hire most of them again in the second and third year. Other teams decided to focus on staff development in order to improve client service and sustain brand loyalty while others increased capital investments in the information technology and systems integration. It was evident that all the teams knew which aspects to focus on. The difficulty came in prioritising which aspect to focus on and when.

These decisions resulted in robust discussions amongst the Fellows that challenged them to think about entrepreneurship holistically instead simply focusing on increasing return on equity. The winning team, Multiply, comprised of engineers and a scientist. Multiply won because they were confident in their strategy despite the poor financial performance they experienced in the first year and consistently applied their strategy.  This reinforced the idea that entrepreneurship is about diversity of thought amongst people who are willing to work together and endure the test of time in order to achieve a common goal.

The simulation did not only give Fellows a skillset on how to make the tough business decisions but also challenged them to think about what entrepreneurship means to them individually and what it looks like. As fellows returned to their ordinary lives, the facilitators encouraged them to interrogate the initial intention driving them towards entrepreneurship and the need this intention addressed. The Accelerated Entrepreneurship lab unlocked each teams’ entrepreneurial potential. Now it’s up to the Fellows, “to harness it, hone it, tap into it, nurture it, nourish it, guide it and watch it grow.”

The appointment of our new CEO

The appointment of our new CEO

It is with great pleasure that we announce the appointment of our new CEO, Yogavelli Nambiar.

Yogavelli succeeds Anthony Farr, who tendered his resignation earlier this year after 12 years at the helm of the Foundation. He will be moving on to take up responsibilities for Allan & Gill Gray Philanthropies (Africa), a philanthropic arm of the Allan & Gill Gray Foundation.

At the time of his resignation, Anthony said: “The greatest adventure of my life was being part of the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation. But as with any adventure there comes a time to step aside.” Yogavelli inherits a well-established Foundation, equipped to embrace a range of new challenges associated with the modern world and to further grow the organisation.

“We are pleased to welcome Yogavelli to her new role as CEO of the Foundation. She has so many insights to offer and we look forward to drawing on her long line of experience developing entrepreneurs across the African continent,” says board chairman, Professor Njabulo Ndebele.

Professor Ndebele again thanked Anthony, who he says delivered well on the Foundation’s inception mandate to invest, inspire and develop individuals who will go on to become high impact, responsible entrepreneurs capable of transforming the future of the Southern African Region.

As the new CEO, Yogavelli joins the Foundation with extensive experience, having previously founded and headed up the Enterprise Development Academy at the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS), business school of the University of Pretoria as its Director, where she led the entrepreneurship efforts of the school within the centre. Prior to that she was Country Director of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women Initiative and led the design and delivery of this successful international women’s entrepreneurship programme in South Africa.

“I am excited to be part of the brainchild of Allan Gray and to work alongside a long line of capable individuals who work tirelessly to help make a sustainable, long-term and positive contribution to Southern Africa. Thank you to the board for entrusting me in my capacity as the Foundation’s new CEO,” Yogavelli says.

Professor Ndebele concludes: “Yogavelli’s experience and expertise will ensure future opportunities are harnessed while building on the institutional capabilities of the Foundation in the process.”

Out of the Mouths of Babes

Out of the Mouths of Babes

While Laaiqah Taliep, a Grade 12 learner at St Cyprian’s School for Girls and Allan Gray Scholar, is technically no longer a babe, she’s sharing wisdom that is well beyond her years. A video she recently created to promote awareness about water misuse and its effect on climate change has already garnered 4 000 views and is likely to continue doing so.

A lot of technical skill and empathetic understanding went into creating Laaiqah’s very poignant animation. It’s clear that she appreciates what’s at stake when even one drop of water is wasted. Coming from Maitland, Cape Town, a humble community that is rife with poverty and unemployment, Laaiqah has had first-hand experience of poverty. “I believe that my experiences have moulded me into the compassionate and empathetic individual I am,” she explains.

The inspiration for becoming a water activist came from her belief that a lack of water is the root cause of poverty. Water is the basis of all life; without water we face problems such a food scarcity, which leads to malnutrition and the hindrance of the productivity of a nation. “I felt it was my obligation to promote awareness. As a young person with the privilege of opportunity I felt it was necessary to take advantage of the power I hold, whether or not it be on a small scale.”

She wants her video to highlight not only the problems surrounding water scarcity and pollution but also how humankind is ironically responsible for the issues causing our world to suffer. “I believe we lack the empathy and awareness required to affect change. My video is, therefore, emotive and hopefully moves its audience enough to obligate them to make a difference.”

In addition to all the views it has received on Facebook, the video has also been promoted on the CIFF organisation’s Twitter page and website as well as on the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation’s blog. “The video has received a larger audience than I could have ever imagined, and for that I feel truly blessed.” She has also managed to promote it within her school and schools in the vicinity as well as in her home community. The positive comments she’s received so far signals a great future for this video and the many more she plans to create.

Laaiqah started a YouTube channel so that she could upload the video and make it more accessible. She hopes that her message will reach many more around the world. The plan is to upload many more videos that will focus not only water awareness but on many other issues our world is faced with. She also plans on sending the video to more schools in Cape Town and then creating a campaign called One Drop; she wants the youth to get involved. “I hope to inspire more youth to make a difference … I strongly believe that the possibility of change lies within our future leaders.” If Laaiqah Taliep is anything to go by, our country will soon have gems coming more oft out of the mouths of more babes.

 

No Turning Back

No Turning Back

 

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Carol Nonhlanhla Gajana accepted the position of Events and Logistics Coordinator at the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation because of her passion for managing events and her love for working with young people. These two skills have also come in handy in the business she started a little more than a year ago.

Team Asijiki, meaning the team for whom there is no turning back, came about as a result of Carol’s personal weight loss journey. “My wakeup call came after a Wellness Assessment day at work,” says Carol. She was shocked to realise that her weight was the same as when she was pregnant two years earlier in 2011. “I realised right there and then that time for excuses had come to an end.”

Soon after her wakeup call Carol started following the healthy lifestyle community on Facebook called SleekGeek. Between January and October of 2014 she managed to lose 6.8kg by cutting out bread, pap, rice and cereals. This was a good start, but she realised that to lose weight faster she would have to commit to the programme 100%. She decided to start SleekGeek Reboot on 3 November 2014. Besides changing her eating habits, she also took to daily exercising before work and in the evenings. Since then she has lost 40kg and now weighs a light 80kg.

Carol’s coordinating skills came to the fore when she started recruiting ladies at work to form part of an accountability group. Twelve ladies joined and met during lunch times for walks or Zumba and Taebo sessions in a meeting room. Her endeavours were recognised by the HR department and she was awarded the title of Ambassador of Healthy Living in the Workplace. Because she had to lead by example, she couldn’t afford to fall off the wagon.

Before long Carol started a second accountability group – this time for her friends. “I created a WhatsApp group and called it Team Asijiki. We posted what we ate and drank for all meals as well as what we did as exercise. The team quickly grew from 10 to 31 ladies from all across South Africa. These ladies had a particularly hard time cutting out starch; they were mostly Xhosa or Zulu ladies whose traditional food consisted of starch, starch and more starch. However, being part of Team Asijiki, they managed to soldier on.

house6The WhatsApp group eventually morphed into a Facebook group that is now 70 000 members strong. The next natural step was turning Team Asijiki into a business brand. So far she has appointed group administrators who champion team spirit through numerous WhatsApp accountability groups, she’s facilitated workshops across South Africa, she’s been interviewed on numerous radio stations and TV programmes, she’s opened the Team Asijiki Health Shop in Khayelitsha and she’s gotten the buy-in from Dis-Chem Pharmacies. After noticing an increase in sales Dis-Chem agreed to put ‘Asijiki Friendly’ labels on all the products they use. Asijiki packs are also couriered to members in towns that have no Dis-Chem, like Umthatha, Queenstown and Limpopo.

Team Asijiki’s 8 week Weight-Loss Challenge has been launched to get everyone ready for Summer 2016. Joining costs R549 and it includes a Reboot Success guide delivered to your doorstep, free exercise plans and a chance to win cash prizes ranging from R4 000 to R10 000 for losing the most weight. Those revellers who prefer enjoying the silly season and starting afresh in January have the option of paying a R100 fee for a 30-day programme that includes coaching on eating clean and exercising as well as regular weigh-ins and lots of group motivation.

Given the success of Team Asijiki, Carol’s expertise is no longer limited to just weight loss. Her advice to budding entrepreneurs who don’t know where to start, is:

  1. Know yourself; identify the problems and issues that you want to improve upon.
  2. Do different things so you can find what you enjoy – then it will be sustainable.
  3. See who else is in the same boat as you and form a forum.
  4. See what the demand is and act on it quickly.

bafana

GEW 2016: Becoming an entrepreneurial explorer in our own cities | By Dinika Govender

GEW 2016: Becoming an entrepreneurial explorer in our own cities | By Dinika Govender

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Global Entrepreneurship Week is the world’s largest celebration of the innovators and job-creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. The global event is anchored by five specific themes: Youth, Women, Cities, Scale-Ups and Investors.

This year the Association of Allan Gray Fellows curated a multi-city experience of Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW). The experience was called Imbizo Junction, so named for its focus on gathering like minds in the same spaces in the city.

In the spirit of connecting to the wider entrepreneurial ecosystem and strengthening the networks and opportunities for our Fellows, the Association mapped entrepreneurial events that took place during GEW in both Johannesburg and Cape Town. The aim was to map a diverse range of events across the five themes and to encourage Fellows and their own social networks to become “entrepreneurial explorers” in their cities.

To this end, the Association produced the Imbizo Junction site – which provided a Fellow-curated event guide that could make entrepreneurial explorations easier and more trusted both for Fellows and the general public. For a first version of this initiative, the site was a hit – 31 000 hits to be exact.

Fellows Nkgopoleng Moloi and Adhila Mayet hosted another successful Talk Series JHB on the topic of “Intersectionality in Entrepreneurship”. It was great to see a Fellow-run event on the GEW map. The Association wrapped up GEW with a pitching competition in which Fellows had the opportunity to win seed funding by submitting a business pitch via social media. Candidate Fellow Foyinsola Ogunrombi had the winning pitch and received R5000 to activate her idea.

With the Global Entrepreneurship Conference (GEC) coming up in March 2017, we look forward to getting more Fellow-run events and businesses on the map.

Allan Gray Orbis Foundation and E² launch their inaugural accelerator programme

Allan Gray Orbis Foundation and E² launch their inaugural accelerator programme

August 2016: The Foundation is of the firm belief that high impact, responsible entrepreneurs will contribute to a positive economic, social and political change by providing access to education and entrepreneurial development. Their inaugural accelerator programme aims to rapidly scale up nine selected entrepreneurial ventures founded by Allan Gray Fellows. These businesses have evolved through a four month iterative process based on lean startup concepts and the Lean Iterator methodology – a process where startups’ refine and validate their ideas with real audiences, making the necessary adjustments to ensure a sustainable business.

The Foundation started this initiative to assist Fellows move from idea mode into action a business startup – research suggests that this is the most difficult and volatile stage of choosing to run a business. Most people stagnate in idea mode and many start-ups fail in the initial stages due to a lack of support and market access. The next phase of this accelerator, launched in Cape Town on 1 September 2016.

The accelerator programme will change the future of nine Fellows who have founded, innovative enterprises intending to impact the South African startup landscape. This, accelerator has been developed by the Foundation in collaboration with E2 and Cactus Advisors supported by Standard Bank Future Labs.

There are nine businesses that were chosen from 30 ideas, these included:

  • AKAN – all natural hair and skin care product range catering to the black natural hair care market. akanorganics.co.za. Business owners: Akosua Koranteng
  • The GradSpace – Graduate recruitment made easy – an exclusive network for top performing university students. Business owners: Apoti Potye and Zanele Malumba
  • Chicco’s Barbers – a franchise that provides a tech-enabled turnkey system to optimise the hair-cutting process, allowing barbers to generate more revenue and operate more professionally. Business owners: Muzi Mthombeni and Thabo Ngcobo
  • HouseMe – connects prospective tenants to landlords of residential accommodation. HouseME allows tenants to bid on what they are willing to pay for a rental and is backed by a dual-sided rating system similar to Uber or Airbnb. houseme.co.za. Business owners: Ben Shaw and Kyle Bradley.
  • Incitech – making simple diagnostic solutions accessible for insightful and actionable information where and when it matters. incitech.co.za. Business owners: Danisa Nkuna and team
  • Map Blitz – an educational, fun and engaging new brand of the world map puzzles with a time challenge. mapblitz.com. Business owners: Wandile Mabanga
  • Parktown – a CT-based clothing brand which aims to remove a customer’s need to try on clothes before purchasing them. All clothing created by Parktown is made-to-measure and assembled locally. https://www.facebook.com/parktownclothing/ Business owners: Zara Hammerschlag and Tamryn Smit.
  • Rooster– alarm app that seeks to change the way people wake up in the morning. Business owners: Dom Koenig and Josh Perry.
  • Scoody – manufactures and distributes a custom garment called the Scoody (Scarf-Hoody) to corporates, sporting brands, schools, societies, events and promotions companies, and individuals. scoody.co.za. Business owners: Sechaba Selialia.

These businesses have evolved through the four month iterative IVC process based on lean startup concepts and the Lean Iterator methodology – a process where startups’ refine and validate their ideas with real audiences, making the necessary adjustments to ensure a sustainable business. The Creation leg of the programme will run for 13 weeks, from the 1st of September to 30th of November 2016 at the Standard Bank Future Labs centre in Cape Town. The founders of these startups’ will be immersed in an intensive programme to rapidly expand their businesses, they will be exposed to mentorship by leading business experts in various industries, insights from target audiences in both consumer and business, strategy development and pitch coaching.

The accelerator enables the selected businesses to rapidly scale up through a structured programme that provides content workshops, business mentors, industry leaders, influencers and experts, in addition to founder-friendly funding. E2 will provide initial funding support to the ventures and at the conclusion of the program; ventures will be eligible for follow-on funding and support.  The nine businesses that complete the program will present the milestones, demos and learnings on the 1st of December 2016.

The Foundation would like to take this opportunity to celebrate the brave Fellows that have taken the first step to starting a business.